7.7.11

Make your own iron-on patches and appliques

DIY iron-on patches & appliques

One of the coolest and simplest craft supplies I’ve come across is paper-backed, iron-on adhesive. The adhesive often comes on a roll or is sold in sheets. It basically consists of an adhesive that melts when heat is applied (via iron) and a paper backing. I created a similar tutorial a few years ago and it continues to be one of my most popular blog posts. I thought it could use some updating.

Supplies:
Paper-backed, iron-on adhesive (can be found in any sewing/ fabric store)
Scissors
Iron
Fabric pencil or Sharpie
Fabric
Something to adhere the iron-on to (a shirt, tote bag, etc.)

Examples of iron-on adhesive:
Thermoweb Iron-on Adhesive
Heat-n-Bond Iron-on Adhesive

1: Start with 1 piece of fabric, large enough to accommodate the size of your patch, and one equal (or lightly smaller) piece of iron-on adhesive. Place the fabric right-side down with the dullish, textured side of the iron-on adhesive facing down on top of it (the shiny side of the adhesive paper will be facing up).

2: Pre-heat your iron, usually on the low setting (follow the directions on the iron-on adhesive packaging for optimal temperature). Iron the shiny side of the transfer paper lightly until the textured side bonds securely with the fabric.

3: Use a template or freehand a design either (a) directly onto the “good” side of the fabric with a fabric pencil OR (b) draw the design directly onto the shiny backside. If you use method (b), remember that your image will be reversed.

4: Cut out your design with fabric scissors.

5: Peel the paper backing from the fabric.

6 & 7: Now you are ready to iron the patch onto a shirt, bag, or whatever your heart desires. Place the material right side up in desired position and iron. Ironing time may depend on thickness of fabric. Iron lightly until you have a secure bond. Sew around the edges (by hand or machine) or embellish as you wish.

anchor applique

Tips:

The adhesive may not hold perfectly over several washes. You can hand or machine stitch around the edge of the patch to ensure that it stays in place. Use a zigzag stitch around the edge if you want to prevent the patch from fraying.

Try not to get the adhesive material on your iron or it could create a sticky mess. Clean the iron after it has cooled.

3 comments:

JaymiPop said...

Thanks for the tutorial. I've been wanting to try this for a while now...

UnrulyArt said...

Appliques are my new favorite thing. I just made my first little dress with some hand drawn appliques for 4th of July and I love the look of it! They really add a little extra somethin' somethin'!

Rachel@oneprettything.com said...

CUTE! I love the anchor! Thanks a bunch, I'll be linking.

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